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It's the comfort of knowing...
Patsy and Dennis Monohan conserved their cattle farm in Anderson County, and in doing so, are helping to ensure agriculture and wildlife habitat will remain viable.

In an increasingly instantaneous and fast-paced world, sometimes it is the things you have to patiently cultivate that can be the most inspiring. For many families like the Monohans there is great reward in planting trees and watching your hard work grow over the years.

Yes, sometimes it’s that connection to the land that means so much that your family decides to protect your land…for the future. “It’s a comforting feeling to know that the farm we have worked on and improved for 40 years will never be developed,” reflected Dennis.

Together, Patsy and Dennis Monohan conserved their cattle farm in Anderson County, and in doing so, are helping to ensure agriculture and wildlife habitat will remain viable.

Conserving your property is a big decision, one that many landowners consider for a number of years. The Monohans were no different.

A voluntary process, conserving heritage

As with farms protected with permanent conservation agreements, called conservation easements, it is a voluntary process where the landowners decide in partnership with Bluegrass Conservancy what the long-term conservation goals for the property should be. The agreements allow for farming practices, improvements, and buildings to change over time. Many allow for a limited number of additional housesites as long as they don’t significantly interrupt the land’s farming or wildlife conservation areas.

Conservation is part of ensuring that the rural areas have a strong financial footing. The land stays on the tax-roles while providing something more to our community beyond those taxes – our rural quality of life including working farms, forests, fresh water, and wildlife habitat.

Each family who makes the decision to conserve their farm is also giving everyone the security that another farm will be providing part of the historic heritage that makes our Kentucky Bluegrass so special.

It just made sense

“We love our farm for 100 reasons that cannot be singled out,” stated Dennis. Now, with the conservation of The Monohan Farm, there will always be an opportunity for local food and wildlife habitat to thrive, along Graefenburg Road in Anderson County, for generations to come.

Here, at Bluegrass Conservancy, we want to say thank you to the Monohans. They join over 100 landowners in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky, who together have conserved family farms that grow a wild variety of crops, produce, and livestock. That’s conservation leadership, one family at a time.

If you would like to explore if land conservation is right for you, contact Ashley Greathouse, Easement Project Counsel, by email or call 859-255-4552. All conversations are confidential to allow each family the privacy they need to make the appropriate decision. 

It's the comfort of knowing...